MAV Arts

MAV arts are the creative outcomes of MAV Projects featuring artists and communities of colour.

Agak-Agak by Janette Hoe

Janette Hoe, Ria Soemardjo, Mindy Meng Wang, Takashi Takiguchi

Agak-Agak is a playful reminisce on Ria, Mindy and my relationship with our grandmothers and the collective, fragmented details of our memories.

Karina Lehman | UpClose 2022

Karina Lehman

“We recorded 2 of my original’s compositions and performed in a trio format with two talented musicians, Amla Periakarpan in the flute and Rodolfo Despaigne “Panga” in the congas. “Vagabundeando”, a gentle bossa-nova that talks about finding your life purpose and the journey you need to take to find this purpose, and “Traigo un son” an optimistic song inspired by the rhythms and textures of Cuban music. I’m truly grateful to be part of this new season of UpClose, it’s not only a great opportunity to share my music and represent my culture and country but also to gain exposure and contribute to the multicultural arts scene in Melbourne. I had a great time shooting with Harmonic Whale and MAV team at the iconic Preston Market, they made me feel very comfortable, and enjoyed every minute.”

Camille El Feghali | UpClose 2022

Camille El Feghali

“My performance includes a variety of folk and classical songs coming from different parts of the middle east (SWANA region). We showcase these diverse and rich cultures in a contemporary way, while staying faithful to the features that make it sound unique, through the use of microtones, odd time signatures, and Taqsims (improvisations). The instruments include: Qanun (Arabic harp), Nay (Arabic flute) and Derbuka/Riq (percussions). What I love about being part of UpClose is that I get to represent my musical heritage in a program that includes various musicians who perform different styles of music to be appreciated by everyone. The engagement with people in public places such as Preston markets was a highlight for me as I got to meet people from my own culture who showed their appreciation as well as people from different backgrounds who asked me lots of questions about it.”

Sarita Mcharg | UpClose 2022

Sarita Mcharg

“I really enjoyed being able to perform at the market and introducing my instrument and culture to so many different kinds of people. It was really nice seeing people of all walks of life and ages just coming up to me and listening, asking me all sorts of questions about my musical journey. Being a local resident of Preston, I am always going to the Preston market for my daily needs. I think the market is such a great place to catch up with friends, and just to see how diverse and rich the community in the area is. It is such a vital place for the community to come together.”

The New Monos | UpClose 2022

The New Monos

“For us, being a part of UpClose 2022 is an honour; sharing music with our local audience and coworkers is what we have missed the most last couple of years. In addition, this allows us to break the stereotypes about Latin people only playing Salsa. We have lived in Darebin for 10 years, and we are happy to see live music events, especially in the Preston Market. We felt so welcome in the Preston Market, a lot of people stopped to listen to the band and watch the performance, asking questions about where we are from and about the instruments. The songs we played were super relaxed, acoustic-style fitting the market creating a nice atmosphere for us to play comfortably and feel welcome.”

Agoness Kuol | Shepparton Culture Kitchen

Agoness Kuol

My table is special to me because when I make food this is the time I get to sit down with my family.

Eman Alabbassi | Shepparton Culture Kitchen

Eman Alabbassi

We have overcome many challenges to adapt to the Australian way of life and the way we eat here. In Iraq, we eat only breakfast and dinner but here we have adopted to the routine of three meals a day.

Le’aisa Pele | Shepparton Culture Kitchen

Le’aisa Pele

Food means a great deal in our family and plays a very important part in our culture and community. In Samoa, no one eats alone. We do not cook small meals, we cook for everyone and we all eat together.

Shakilla Naveed | Shepparton Culture Kitchen

Shakilla Naveed

Since moving to Australia, the way we cook and eat has changed a lot. In Australia. I have tried very hard to involve my husband and my children in cooking meals but back in my country, the mother or wife only would cook.

Yusniza Yusoff | Shepparton Culture Kitchen

Yusniza Yusoff

“I love to cook. I love sharing my food with my friends and neighbours, my community because I feel happy when people enjoy my food."

Ane Fotu | Shepparton Culture Kitchen

Ane Fotu

Fakamaloía he polokalama Shepparton Culture Kitchen, he ngaahi faingamalie kuo ne ómai kia te au mo hoku famili óu lava ai ke vahevahe hoku úlungaanga faka-fonua

Ree Peric | Shepparton Culture Kitchen

Ree Peric

Ree is a young Fijian-Croatian woman who was exposed to a wide variety of different cultures from a young age through her mother’s missionary work in Brisbane. Ree also lived in Uganda for some time, where she learned to cook things like nsenene (grasshopper) and fufu with her grandparents.

FlatMates by Khalid Farah

Khalid Farah

FlatMates was collated as a response to the 9-tower lockdown of 2020 in North Melbourne and Flemington.

Community Stills by Khalid Farah

Khalid Farah

Art is an expression of one’s own life, it is a journey of self-discovery loaded with emotions. These images are the culmination of emotions I have encountered since the 9Tower Lockdown over a year ago.

Netsanet by Zelalem Negatu

Zelalem Negatu

The hard lockdown was a difficult and confusing time for me and triggered some bad memories and feelings from my past. I wrote this song on the second day of lockdown when I almost felt as if we wouldn’t get out alive!

BLVCK GOLD

Geskeva Komba, Ez Eldin Deng, Ras-Samuel Welda’abzgi

BLVCK GOLD is a short film and fictional story of amateur athlete, Tino, who uses running as a way to escape from old wounds but they come back and haunt him after a childhood friend gives him a mystery object.

Trapped Inside by KidDave | Voices of the Beautiful Struggle

KidDave, Khaled Abdulwahab

Trapped Inside is a hip-hop/rap song aimed at exposing the effects that the covid-19 lockdowns have had on the community – “from the east to the west, from the north to the south”.

How We Feel by TruSoule | Voices of the Beautiful Struggle

Khaled Abdulwahab , TruSoule

The song, How we feel, came from a collective expressionist point of view from my peers and community’s experiences during last years harsh lockdown of the housing estates in Flemington and North Melbourne.

Barricaded In by Nada Osman | Voices of the Beautiful Struggle

Khaled Abdulwahab , Nada Osman, CYNDYCUT

Barricaded In is a spoken word piece I wrote describing the treatment of the residents of the 9 towers lockdown.

Monster by Thirty1 | Voices of the Beautiful Struggle

Thirty1, Khaled Abdulwahab

When I heard that the Shelter 2 project is collaborating with local creatives. I decided to submit the beat I made during the lockdown.

My Story by Barry Berih | Community Stories

Barry Berih

When I heard the news that North Melbourne and Flemington were in a lockdown my heart started to beat.

My Story by Sumaya | Community Stories

Sumaya

“I created this recording because during the hard lockdown we weren’t notified and only had one hour’s notice before our freedom was taken away. No time to prepare. We didn’t have enough food to eat at home and it made us feel like we were in prison. I want other people to know what it was like for us during this time and how it affected our mental health and our wellbeing.”

Who am I? by Khalid Farah | Community Stories

Khalid Farah

“My piece brings to light the barriers that minority groups face brought on by structural inequality."

Connected by Tina Tang

Tina Tang

Connected is a series of illustrations that document moments of solidarity I have experienced and witnessed during the events of hard lockdown.

Confined by Haniyah Abdou Said

Haniyah Abdou Said

After experiencing the hard lock down, I challenged the thoughts and feelings of the others around me as well as myself into this artwork.

Sara Zakaria | Flemington Sisters

Sara Zakaria

“My name is Sara Zakaria. Home is in Sudan and now, Australia since 2004. When my son was born in 2006 I made Australia my permanent home. I look after my son, take him to school and soccer and keep busy with my friends. I work in Moonee Valley cooking my sweets and different kinds of foods. I became part of this project because I wanted to share my cooking, especially my sweets, which everyone likes. The lockdown was very bad for me, just sitting at home and I couldn’t go out. Talking with my friends and family on the phone helped me get through that time. I’m here to help people with food, sweets and cooking anytime!”

Huida Omer | Flemington Sisters

Huida Omer

“My name is Huida Omer. Home is in Sudan and for the past 20 years I’ve made Australia home. Australia is a good country for education and health and good for living. You can find good jobs as long as you have a qualification. The main thing that keeps me busy is my 3 children, I have 3 girls. In 2018 I was diagnosed with breast cancer and spent a year in intensive treatment. Since then I have to rest a lot but it’s important for me to stay connected with my friends and that’s why I’ve joined the Shelter 2 project. The hard lockdown, at first I felt sad and it felt unfair that we were the only ones being locked down like this in Melbourne. But later when I realized that there were some families here in the flats with COVID, I was glad that we were locked down like this. We all share the same facilities and live close together and I was worried because my own immune system and one of my daughter’s immune system is not 100%. We stayed home for 5 days and spent the time watching the news and finding out more about what’s happening and understanding the pandemic. There were people helping us and bringing food so it was okay in the end.”

Ruth Eyakem | Flemington Sisters

Ruth Eyakem

“My name is Ruth Eyakem. I was born and raised in Ethiopia but I am from Eritrea. I came to live in Australia 28 years ago because of war in my home country, to look for a better life. I live in the Flemington high rise with my lovely daughter. We speak English and Arabic. I love cooking, my job is waitressing and I love hosting and serving people. I chose to be part of Shelter 2 because the hard lockdown was very stressful and I wanted to share how I passed through that time. When I first heard about the 5 day lockdown on the news I went quickly to buy medication that I need for stress and anxiety. I had none left at home but they would not let me out of the building and said they would bring us everything we needed. It never came and that was hard for me. But I had my traditional coffee ceremony and this became so important. During the lockdown I did it everyday with my daughter. It helped me pass the time, helped to calm my nerves. It gave me a good feeling of having my friends and family around me and kept me calm. My coffee ceremony was my medicine.”

Awatif Taha | Flemington Sisters

Awatif Taha

“My name is Awatif Taha. Home is Sudan and for the past 20 years, Australia. I like Australia for its humanity, rights, education, health and job opportunities. I work and volunteer my time with my community across different fields, but especially with women and kids. I’m involved in running a homework club and working with the Multicultural Sudanese Centre where we have provided women with certified training in commercial cooking. A big project I’m involved in at the moment is Mum’s Kitchen which developed through co-design with Moonee Valley City Council. Mum’s Kitchen is for women from different African backgrounds to build skills and confidence for them to access employment opportunities in aged care, child care and hospitality and to create their own business which might also support employment of other women in the community. During the hard lockdown I was so busy working with different organisations and DHHS, door knocking to get information to people, ask them what they needed and link them to services to make sure their needs were met. I especially helped with new arrivals and old women who needed extra support. I also did some media interviews on radio about our situation and I wrote an article that was published in The Guardian. For the Shelter 2 project I have brought together 7 other women from different African backgrounds who live in the high-rises, to share our recipes and eat together and it’s been amazing. For us it’s not only about sharing our food but also about us having confidence and affirming our value in the community.”

Halima Ahmed | Flemington Sisters

Halima Ahmed

“My name is Halima Ahmed. Home is Eritrea and since 1999 I’ve been living in Australia. I like everything about Australia especially the education and it’s a beautiful country. I have my family here so it’s good for me. I’m a very busy woman, I have five grown up children and two grandchildren. I’m working now with Mum’s Kitchen cooking and also as a cleaner at the child care centre. I have lots of nice and friends and also look after my mother. For the Shelter 2 project, I’ve been able to share with other African women. It’s been especially a good opportunity for mum’s who work hard at home to tell our stories. Often we don’t get the chance to tell our stories, and no one asks us and often no one listens, but every mother has a story. The hard lockdown, it was very hard for us and maybe they did it too quickly and we didn’t have time to prepare. But it was important for our health and to protect us because we live very close to each other here in the flats, using the same lifts, using the same laundry as other families. We also have a lot of old people and vulnerable people in our community here so it was important that we protect each other.”

Emebet Asfaw | Flemington Sisters

Emebet Asfaw

“My name is Emebet Asfaw, people call me Amy. Home is Ethiopia and I’ve been living in Australia for over 20 years now. Now Australia is my home. I like the freedom and peace here. I used to work in hospitality and I keep busy now by cooking and looking after my kids. Vegan cooking is my specialty and my recipes are popular. Every month I have a stall at the Vegan Market in Richmond selling my food. During the hard lockdown I was worried about COVID and spent my time researching a lot of different foods and the vitamins they contain and their benefits to protect my family’s health. The lockdown was a very damaging experience and really increased anxiety levels. I worry about what’s going to happen next.”

Leila Ali | Flemington Sisters

Leila Ali

“My name is Leila Ali. Somalia is home and I’ve been living in Australia for 25 years. Before coming to live in Melbourne I was in Papua New Guinea for one year. PNG was nice but there was too much fighting. I like the peace here in Australia and it’s fair. I keep busy with my work in Mum’s Kitchen in Moonee Valley cooking food for people in need and delivering the food to everyone. I have six children and still two are living at home. The hard lockdown made me feel very scared and I spent a lot of time looking out my window and talking to my friends on the phone. I felt jealous when I looked outside and saw all the police and other people walking around. I felt like why am I stuck here and everyone else is outside. During the lockdown I didn’t want the food that the government was bringing, my community looked after me and brought the halal foods. But I didn’t need food, I just needed air and to get outside again. I wanted to be part of Shelter 2 because I like spending time with my friends. I am the only Somali woman in this team and I wanted to share my special dishes from my culture.”

Samira Ali Musa | Flemington Sisters

Samira Ali

“My name is Samira Ali. Home is in Sudan and now in Flemington since 2000. I speak Arabic and Tigray. Australia is a nice country and we have a good life. I wanted to be part of Shelter 2 because I like to share my culture and want people to learn about my culture and maybe try our food. I wasn’t scared of the hard lockdown. Actually it was good for me because I cleaned my house, I had time to cook the food I like to eat and had time to discuss some important family business with my children. I stayed connected with my friends during the lockdown through our Whatsapp group so it was okay.”

Audio Pandemic by Ali Choudhry and Dr. Matthew Latif

Ali Choudry, Dr. Matthew Latif

“Audio Pandemic” by Ali Choudhry and Dr. Matthew Latif is a novel, timely, and innovative project that uses the processes of “data sonification”, “data visualisation”, and “algorithmic composition” in a creative context to create audio-visual representations of the COVID-19 virus.

She takes shelter in her body by Candy Bowers

Candy Bowers

“Faded, but still there” is a series of seven digital works exploring the notion of home – it can be a physical place where one can live, but it can also refer to the community, online forums and memories that trigger nostalgia.

Nudes Descending by Christos Linou

Christos Linou

Nudes Descending is an abstract dance duet, oil on canvas painting.

Yum Cha – Together! by Jenny Zhe Chang

Jenny Zhe Chang

Yum Cha – Together! is based on both the installation Yum Cha – Sharing Monuments, which was created for the MAV’s Mapping Melbourne, Australia 2017, and the artwork Yum Cha with Milk Tea presented for the South Wind Rises, Asia-Pacific Contemporary Art Exhibition in Taipei, Taiwan 2018.

Choice by Samuel Gaskin

Samuel Gaskin

A spoken word piece by creative BOSS Samuel Gaskin that examines the power of Culture being marginalised and oppressed.

Déjà vu by Mahla Karimian

Mahla Karimian

Déjà vu. A feeling of having already experienced the present situation.

This Dome by Reagan Romero Maiquez and Eh Su

Reagan Romero Maiquez, Eh Su

This Dome is an art project that combines Karen music, poetry, and video recording that examines the life of migrants and refugees during a lockdown period. We have incorporated spoken word and music to produce slices of life experienced by a family, community, and friends during the lockdown and amidst the COVID-19 pandemic.

Miniature Jelly Art Journey by Naazi Kakavand

Naazi Kakavand

In this video, I present the process of making a Persian dessert, as well as injecting cream and colour, which I like to call drawing Miniature Jelly Art.

বাসা (Nest) by Anindita Banerjee

Anindita Banerjee

“An authentic home is a place that physically holds memories. When one moves several times, they have to negotiate the challenge of packing up memories to bring them along.

The Soundtrack of 2020 by River Loizou

River Loizou

With this piece of work, The Soundtrack of 2020, I’ve tried to create an auditory story using cinematic music to reflect certain events throughout 2020. In each event, I’ve aimed to mimic different genres such as “Super heroes” “Horror” and “Action”.

Family Budget Plan by Youbi Lee (UB)

Youbi Lee

Playing with these themes, in webtoon (digital comic) format, the story involves a mother in Melbourne and her experience of homeschooling during the COVID-19 lockdown.

LOVECORE by Margot Tanjutco

Margot Tanjutco

LOVECORE is dead behind the eyes and trying to cheer itself up. This piece is a video collage of my own writing, found/archival footage, gifs, and music.

Stages in Isolation by Beatrice Rubio-Gabriel

Beatrice Rubio-Gabriel

The writing traverses various orientations and sometimes bleeds into one other, blurring the events happening within my mind and outside of it.

Shining a Light by Stefan Berhardt

Stefan Berhardt

Shining a Light is a series of photographic art that highlight both resilience as well as battles we are experiencing in this moment in time.

Chrysos by Thuy On

Thuy On

I have written a suite of poems to explore the concept of hopefulness and resilience.

Little Ember by DollFace (Benji Miu)

DollFace (Benji Miu)

A love letter. To a middle-class childhood. Late ‘80’s. Pop! Pop from Asia, wow. Playing in the fragrant, Chinese Restaurant. The one that the family once had.

Scotty So as Scarlett So Hung Son as Grace Chang Teaching You All About Hygiene

Scotty So

This work was inspired by my déjà vu between the current pandemic situation and my experience of SARs in 2003 in Hong Kong.

Home, tomorrow by Ruhi Lee

Ruhi Lee

This lyric essay was inspired by the idea of re-imagining home. It found it’s form as I asked myself over and over again, “What is home, really?” and “Why?”

Shelter by Ria Soemardjo

Ria Soemardjo

I was drawn to record a song that leaves the listener into a space of calm and reflection, and a spark of hopefulness.

My COVID-19 Diary by Valentina Serebrennikova

Valentina Serebrennikova

As an Artist with a bouquet of emotional traumas and crises: mid age dilemma, immigrants’ homesickness and loneliness; at the beginning of COVID-19 I started my diary, where I wrote down, by text and visual sketches, my current emotions, thoughts and fears.

Mantra by Amicus Atman

Amicus Atman

Part of a series of ongoing work, Mantra, we explore the power of mantra and its transformative abilities.

‘Mother’ by Sandy Hsu

Sandy Hsu

Who are you when you are alone? Who do you perform for?

Cada Hogar es un Mundo by Arun Munoz

Arun Munoz

Positive Adaptation During Times of COVID-19

SUNDAY by Laura Cionci

Laura Cionci

My everyday life is outside my usual spaces. I got stuck in Australia and had to integrate into a family life. This is my new artistic production: flowing into the interstices of an already existing intense relationship.

Uncertain Times by Serah Nathan and Hayley Beveridge

Serah Nathan

Uncertain Times is a comedy about Hayley and Serah, two housemates from the suburbs, desperately trying to navigate their lives during coronavirus and the subsequent lockdown restrictions.

Yellow in the Blue by Rachel Ang

Rachel Ang

Recently I’ve been thinking about the home as a really charged space where public and private have now completely collapsed. Doors are now barricades, screens are windows, spaces that were voids are now filled and curtains no longer promise privacy.

If we could hug by Irihipeti Waretini and Bella Waru

Irihipeti Waretini, Bella Waru

If we could hug… it would feel like coming home.

Dear little me by Birkti Mesfin

Birkti Mesfin

My written piece is a story penned to my younger self.

No one on the island by Astrid Mendez

Astrid Mendez

Drawing inspiration from John Donne’s poem, “No man is an island,” this creative exploration portrays the incoherence of the individualist ideology which COVID-19 outbreak has unveiled. Since “we are involved in mankind” all human needs have the same weight. A clod is to a continent like a person’s death is to a loss.

I Touch Myself by Cindy Jiang, Francis Cao, James Emmanuel Mckinnon

Cindy Jiang, James Emmanuel Mckinnon, Francis Cao

‘I touch myself’ is a love note to our bodies in isolation. As we find ourselves deprived of con-nection through touch, we grapple with the grief of physical loneliness.

Moment of Hope by Supansa (Nicky)

Supansa Thongsuk (Nicky)

I find the realism of life translates through the human body. I hope to show the importance of my cultural diaspora, through my humanist imagery.

Drop • 雫 • หยาดหยด by Nakarin Jaikla

Nakarin Jaikla

Drop • 雫 • หยาดหยด” is a collaborative project between Nakarin Jaikla and Tithipol Kanteewong and Cyouka Ogata – Thai and Japanese Musicians based in Japan. I use my body to portray the story of water and expresses myself through “Yoake”.

mi gudú, by Marla Celeste

Marla Celeste

I’ve always had a difficult relationship with Australia and with my family. These tenuous connections are central to my reasons for having spent most of my adult life living overseas. Most recently, I spent just over four years living in South America before abruptly evacuating from my home in Lima, Peru to Australia in the midst of the pandemic.

The Spirit of Time by Daniel Seifu

Daniel Seifu

I have created an audio instrumental music piece called, The Spirit of Time.

Transcend by Giovanna Da Silva

Giovanna Da Silva

The concepts I have explored for this project are ‘finding new meaning and ways of being’ and ‘transformation’.

I Never Saw You Again by Gelareh Pour

Gelareh Pour

I am not alone, nor anybody else. With creativity and making connections, my love and passion for music has always pushed me through boundaries.

Love Letter for Turkish Delights by Jonathan Homsey

Jonathan Homsey

Love Letter for Turkish Delights is a 15-minute audiobook dedicated to the buoyant texture of this sweet delicacy. Inspired by research across two continents, this project uses the atmosphere of Richard Mercer’s Love Song Dedications, somatic and street dance along with mindfulness to invite people to find the air within their body and space within the thinking mind. To find this air I use the metaphor and the experience of eating a Turkish Delight.

Faded, but still there by Ellen Yeong Gyeong Son

Ellen Yeong Gyeong Son

“Faded, but still there” is a series of seven digital works exploring the notion of home – it can be a physical place where one can live, but it can also refer to the community, online forums and memories that trigger nostalgia.

Tomorrow by Luc Yong

Luc Yong

I am exploring and responding to the idea of ‘Transformation‘. I have chosen this idea based on various meanings of the word; a marked change in form, nature or appearance / a metamorphosis during the life cycle of an animal.

Home(s) by Mimo Mukii

Mimo Mukii

“Home(s)” is a response to the idea of reimagining home, and it explores the notion of feeling a sense of home in multiple places and with multiple people.

Vain by Madi Colville Walker

Madi Colville Walker

The main inspiration for this song is personal growth and taking the time to listen to myself during quarantine.

Submerged by Mimi Leung

Mimi Leung

Submerged presents two unique responses to the experience of being ‘othered’ as women of colour, and the importance of defining your own value. For Mimi Leung, this is about grappling with an internal struggle with her body, and her attempts to break free of expectations from self and society.

Te Pae o Maumahara by Tāne Te Manu McRoberts

Tāne Te Manu McRoberts

Te Pae o Maumahara, directly translated ‘The Site of Memories’, is a traditionally woven work, made from a mix of contemporary and natural materials.

not your zaddy, not yet your asian fantasy by Jonathan Homsey

Jonathan Homsey

Racism and oppression in the LGBT+ community is rampant and I hope this video motivates other Queer People of Colour (QPOC) to brush the people off who implicitly and explicitly project oppression and sexual racism.

LIMINAL X Mapping Melbourne “Time Series”

LIMINAL

TIME, a collection of Art and Writing by LIMINAL Magazine

Joelistics presents Film School: Still the Quivering Air

Joelistics (Joel Ma)

Joelistics Presents Film School: Still the Quivering Air is a lot of things, it started off as an album and evolved into a series of collaborative filmed dance pieces that work as a unified whole drawing imagery from Asian ghost stories recontextualised in suburban Melbourne.

5 Days by Jun Kiyoshi | ToA Connect

Jun Kiyoshi

5 Days is a mix of 4 days’ worth of results, mixed with image processing to create the day’s product.

Borealis by Adolfo Aranjuez

Adolfo Aranjuez

Borealis is at once reflection and provocation, taking the form of both a retrospective of the year-that-was and a transmission from the future.

Qôca by Ammar Yonis

Ammar Yonis

Qôca, a series demonstrating the joy that could exist if afro-textured hair wasn’t seen as a foreign element in corporate settings.

Kibou (hope) amongst Chaos by Ai Yamamoto

Ai Yamamoto

This shadow image is shot in our kitchen. Shadows appear on this wall in April, May and June and these images are a reminder of autumn days. The autumn golden light brings some hope (kibou) and melancholy, always.

Submerged by Ree

Ree Peric

Submerged presents two unique responses to the experience of being ‘othered’ as women of colour, and the importance of defining your own value. Ree’s works look to external representations of the physical body to reconsider white beauty standards, by centering Afrocentric beauty and solidarity.

40 Days by Aarti Jadu + Xan Coppinger

Aarti Jadu, Xan Coppinger, Vinod Prasanna

40 Days’ is a witnessing of artist development, and a study of sound and being.

Nina Rose for UpClose 2021

Nina Rose

UpClose is a new online music video showcase presenting intimate performances and interviews with culturally diverse Victorian singer-songwriters.

Stefania Serna for UpClose 2021

Stefania Serna

UpClose is a new online music video showcase presenting intimate performances and interviews with culturally diverse Victorian singer-songwriters.

Yusupha Ngum for UpClose 2021

Yusupha Ngum

UpClose is a new online music video showcase presenting intimate performances and interviews with culturally diverse Victorian singer-songwriters.

NOMAD for UpClose 2021

NOMAD

UpClose is a new online music video showcase presenting intimate performances and interviews with culturally diverse Victorian singer-songwriters.

Big Bao presents: Medium Spicy 2

Big Bao, Ali Adriano, Tavis Pinnington, Michelle Nguyen, Grace Quiason, 黑芝麻 (Hei Zhi Ma), Sydney Farey

Medium Spicy 2 is presented by Asian-Australian artist collective Big Bao. A second iteration of Medium Spicy 2019, this virtual project pairs 3 sound artists with 3 visual artists to create a series of works bringing together the richness of the Asian-Australian creative experience.

Centre For New Geography by Victoria Chiu and RDYSTDY

Victoria Chiu , RDYSTDY

CENTRE FOR NEW GEOGRAPHY is a new digital place designed and built by artists.

Forever Dance by Creature Creature

Creature Creature

Our piece is titled ‘Forever Dance‘. It is about moving, persisting, dancing forward in harmony, bound to something you believe in, something noble, strong and beautiful.

The Beauty of Verticality by Jennifer Cheung | ToA Connect

Jennifer Cheung

This piece is expressing how urban design for high-density environments affect the meaning of urban space through the current trends and challenges in urban development.

Love in the Air by Emily Wong | ToA Connect

Emily Wong

The work expresses different forms (or another side) of ‘love’ through colours and lines.

Connection by Jinglu Liu and Golem Klon VIII | ToA Connect

Golem Klon VIII, Jinglu Liu

The work takes place in a virtual space where the moving character represents us, the audiences who are able to travel freely without boarder.

Omoon in the Teapot by Youbi Lee and Yee Wen Soo

Youbi Lee, Yee Wen Soo

Omoon in the teapot is a short puppetry theatre video, playing with the concept of alter ego. Set in the olden days, a young peasant found a magic teapot which took him to his ideal world.

Sanctuary by The Echoes Project

Ria Soemardjo, (Jon)Pongjit Saphakhun, Ron Reeves , Max Milne

In ‘Sanctuary’ we are creating a contemporary performance ritual centered around an old tree next to the Merri Creek, sharing our unique creative process in a short video.

Mother by Mindy Meng Wang

Mindy Meng Wang, Kun Li

Mother is the most private work from the COVID inspired project Enduring Union, in which I use music, film and images to tell stories from Wuhan, my hometown Lanzhou, and where I live now, Melbourne.

Mask by Soyoun Kim

Soyoun Kim

The current Covid-19 pandemic appears to offer the chance to reflect on how we live together and it reminds of the deeply rooted racial discrimination.

The Colour of Absence

Henry Roll

Syrian-Australian artist Miream Salameh fled her beloved homeland in 2012. Already an accomplished artist on her arrival in Australia, Salameh is compelled to process her experiences of conflict and displacement through her multidisciplinary art practice, driven by an obligation to acknowledge the lives of her spiritual, intellectual and political heroes as part of her own survival and adaptation to a new country. The Colour of Absence explores how the intricate connections between memory, place, people, objects and identity are inflected by her experiences. Salameh engages performance, video and photography to address her deeply personal experience of fleeing Syria as a dissident, together with the ongoing situation of her fellow Syrians who still live under threat or are detained as political prisoners, sometimes for years in darkness and solitary confinement. These meditative pieces reflect on what it means to be absent from the place you belong to and the specific qualities of loss and distance that accompany exile. For Salameh, her monotone video works express the way memories lose vivid detail and colour through distance or confinement. In stark contrast, the bright colours of her collage images of the personal belongings she carried when she fled Syria, convey optimism, nostalgia and the sense of home Salameh carries with her. This is Salameh’s first solo exhibition in Australia, a significant milestone as she develops a powerful visual language to express her presence in a new place. Read catalogue essay written by Anna Sande.